COVID-19 RESOURCES

The Austin Hatcher Foundation is closely monitoring the global COVID-19 outbreak and taking steps to ensure the health

and safety of our patients, families, and employees. Here you will find answers to questions you may have on COVID-19 and resources on how to talk to your children, tips for getting back into school mode and much more.

 COVID-19

COVID-19 stands for coronavirus disease 2019. It is a respiratory infection that is passed from person to person. A respiratory infection is an illness that affects the nose, throat, airways, or lungs. Most people with COVID-19 have mild symptoms, similar to a cold or the flu, but some people can develop more serious problems like pneumonia

What is

 COVID-19

COVID-19 is a respiratory illness (like a cold or the flu) caused by a virus. Symptoms of COVID-19 include fever, cough, chills, shortness of breath, body aches, runny nose, and loss of the sense of smell or taste. Symptoms usually develop 2-12 days after exposure to the virus.

Symptoms of

 COVID-19

COVID-19 can spread from close contact with an infected person. When an infected person coughs or sneezes, respiratory droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or may possibly be inhaled into the lungs.

The virus may also be spread when a person touches a surface with the virus and then touches their eyes, nose, or mouth. The virus may live on surfaces for a few days.

spread

How does

 COVID-19

Anyone can get COVID-19. The illness is spread person-to-person. In other words, anyone can develop COVID-19 after coming in close contact with someone infected with the virus. The virus may also be spread when a person touches a surface with the virus and then touches their eyes, nose, or mouth.

Who can get

 COVID-19

Overall, children seem to be at lower risk for serious illness due to COVID-19. This does not mean that children don’t get COVID-19. But the risk of severe illness in children is generally lower.

In most cases, the highest risk for complications with COVID-19 is seen in older adults and patients with chronic health problems such as heart disease, diabetes, lung problems, or people with weak immune systems.

Children and

 COVID-19

Cancer and cancer treatments can weaken the immune system. This means that a child with cancer is often at higher risk for infection and illness.

Study's have shown  pediatric cancer patients with COVID-19 continue to do relatively well. But it’s possible that more severe illness could occur, so close observation is needed.

Childhood Cancer and

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TALKING TO YOUR CHILDREN ABOUT COVID-19

Coronavirus has caused many changes and challenges s in daily life. Children may be confused, worried, or scared. Parents & caregivers often don’t know what to say. Here is a great reference from our friend at St. Jude 

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BACK TO SCHOOL AMID COVID-19

While the right solution may look different for every family, you can take steps with your children to help reduce risk once the school year arrives. Here is a great reference from our friends at Coverage

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TALKING TO YOUR TEEEN ABOUT

COVID-19

It can be hard for teens to understand how and why COVID-19 is creating so many changes for them, their school, social life, and more. Here is a resource from our friends at St. Jude. 

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COVID-19 AND CHILDHOOD CANCER SURVIVORS

As a childhood cancer survivor, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic may cause you an extra sense of worry. That’s natural. Here is a great reference from our friend at St. Jude 

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COVID-19 MAY EFFECT IEP + 504 PLANS

If your child has an Individualized Education or 504, Plan you may have questions about how they are affected by coronavirus-related school closings. Here is a great reference from our friend at St. Jude 

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